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of minutes. because of technology, because of things changing so rapidly. it is a brand new world. vicki, thank you for the importance of that network and everything else. thank you. next, i want to introduce you to a gentleman. he is tall, dark, handsome. sorry, that was me. wrong script. [laughter] you, too, right? it's your birthday, right? ok. in all seriousness, a gentleman by the name of dmitri is here. i want you to meet him. his name is dmitri belzer. he has worked in the disability community for years providing technology access for more than 30 years. trained as a sign language expert and interpreter, he established a death services program ast san francisco state university, provided support services for colleges. we don't call them disabled. they happen to have a disability. he joined pacific bell, helped organize honda the advisory group for people that happen to have a disability. he gave them put to that company on how to develop features that will help them do better. he became the director of death and disabled services. he was executive director for berkeley in 2001. un
senior centers, this is part of our broadband technology grant, the average cost is zero. [laughter] if you were to buy this for your home, it costs a couple of hundred dollars. the games cost between $20.40 dollars. they have hundreds of different games to play. to the games cost between $20.40 dollars. and hundreds of different games to play. we have other adaptive devices that can be used with the wii. this is a foot pedal. -- this is a foot pedal. along with the buttons on the hand device connected to alicia's remote, we can use foot pedals if there are games the require numerous controls. it is very adaptive. then, really interesting. what about someone who may be a quadriplegic and does not have the ability to use arms or legs? there is a sip and tug adapter that allows someone to control the wii with his or her mouth. you can still engaged the wii by puffing into the tube. this company has made the wii completely accessible for anyone to play. it is a great option. if you want more information about the adaptive equipment for the wii, visit alicia's booth. >> i work for the i
at the programs, traveling around the world, that there is one constant. there are people and technology that say this is a place they want to be. entrepreneurs say this is where they want to be. when companies like facebook are started at an institution like harvard and a pier, you start to recognize why this is so special and fiber and why innovation is a bleeding heart economy. so let me try to give some brief introductions about our panel today. i have to confess, i only just met one of our panelists, lee said dyson, the ceo of coverity. she got a ph.d. in physics from mit but felt the urge to come out here to california and she did her research at stanford and lawrence berkeley. that is an indication we are getting smart people like her out to california to start companies like hers. 15 employees in 2008. it is interesting, we talk about cloud computing and these technology companies, but she takes electronic waste that is rich in carbon and recycles that into oil for plastics and a variety of other things. i wish i had more time to talk to you and get to know you because i am sure there's a
needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the things that we have changed. and change every day. if we can't imagine what is going to happen by christmas time. you don't even have to go to the pharmacy to say, fill this out. pick up a phone, punch in, go and get it. send your kids over. i know. simple point,
: in terms of water supply, wastewater, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water
are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show u
. a big logo slide. >> and we're supposed to be about the technology. >> imagine a big stop bullying speak up logo on the slide behind me. >> say that again. >> stop bullying, speak up is the name of the campaign and a nice transition. my complements to everyone in the room. if i have learned everything in the last four years while researching bullying prevention and for our age group and the kids in the second through seventh grade it's that not only does it take a village but a village of people who are willing to partner and collaborate with each other and speak not only to adults about this issue but speak to children and i think it's an interesting transition from mia's work to mine. still not mine. >> it is but -- >> and the role we play at cartoon network and thousands of kids at home everyday and the role we play is taking that information, translating it and content on the line and when kids come independently to our screens to play games and watch television and do a variety of things we have information for them on information they care deeply part. in 2008 as research we do
. they have access to modern technology. they have social networking. they have smart phones. they have the internet and the use of technology then allows them to access questionnaires about their substance use, to participate in social networking support groups, and to link up with electronic health records or their counselors and to have online counseling if they're reluctant to go to face-to-face counseling. so technology offers a great deal of promise that young people are more comfortable with and use on a regular basis. so this is a revolutionary time for our youth and we hope to take advantage of the technological advances to promote recovery. [music playing] where's mom? did she forget me? i wonder what happened to her. what if i get left here? drugs and alcohol may make you forget your problems for a moment, but that's not all you forget. my mother worked hard to be in recovery and i love her for that. for drug and alcohol treatment for you or someone you love, call 1-800-662-help. brought to you by the u.s. department of health and human services. i think one of the keystones
think it's just taking the next step into technology and treatment and integrating that into an effective way for young kids to approach treatment. this is a technology-based generation and, therefore, they're encountering technology on a daily basis whether it be social media, courses online, schoolwork, projects. so this addresses their treatment environment in a context that they are very familiar with. jonathan, when and how should a parent first intervene? we have heard from justin and his experience. but overall, what-we know the signs. we already talked about them. how should they intervene with a potentially problem situation? you know, tami used an important word, which was to have the conversation. i think that is crucial to begin to talk about what they see, what their concerns are and what is going on. it can be very challenging because, you know, as i think bridget and justin mentioned, adolescence is a time of experimentation. it's a time of risk taking. so, you know, one doesn't want to smother your kid or be what is referred to nowadays as a "helicop
that historically has suffered from maybe the worst website and some of the worst technology in government. and over the last few years we have worked really hard to improve that park user's experience through the use of technology. and i want to start out before we talk a little about the app saying a if you thank yous. i really want to thank mayor lee to his incredible commitment to technology and frankly the recreation and park department. i want to thank supervisor chiu who has been a leader both in the parks world and in the technology world. sf city has really been a driving force behind helping government think about new ways, new and improved ways maybe for some of you they're old ways now. but new and improved ways for government to reach users of our programs and services. and i want to say the last special thank you to the folks from apple-liscious. this thing is awesome. this past year, the trust for public land which is a national parks organization determined that san francisco, which has 4,000 acres of open space and over 220 parks, over 15% of the city's land is open space. the trust
leaders the first time in our memories the mayor and others and we all agree that technology, expediting our kids earlier with the expectation for college and seth them to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal grab the to bring job training in our mission neighborhood. the supervisor knows about this. these gains are possible because reforms are underway the partnership are in place. for our kids to succeed in this economy we must do more. that's why this year i will propose in my budgeted more resources more than $50,000,000,000 and $25 million for preschool activities. i view education as an be investment not an expense. the folk in the road for many kids and many families the point at which they decide they're though stay in san francisco or leave. you're going to hear me talking about this layoff a lot this year. i want our middle squirr
and has a federal back bone and it is typically used to foster new anti-terrorism technology and someone has designed something that they think will preclude a terrorist from being successful, it is in the building for the facilities like the transit center to have the opportunity to be designated and certified as a safety act facility. we are on the bleeding edge, no. we are on the leading edge, yes. the executive director charged the design team and the consultant team to follow best practice and to make sure that this facility was designed in a way that was similar to other significant assets. these are a list of other entitis that have gone about filing for safety acts, we are not the first. but you are certainly on a list with the major players. this was a little bit more information. if you want to obtain safety act designation, there are a bunch of things that you have to do. this is a listing of the enhancements in safety and security that are expected when you are reviewed for safety act designation and certification. i will go through these in more detail. these are the investm
the technology breakthroughs have international capacity. i think that is why we need a regional approach. that is why i am here, to make sure we protect our hetch hetchy water system. that creates the standard of living that we want, that keeps people here. that is why we have regional transport systems. whatever companies do not come here could end up going to europe or japan or china. we want them to maybe have their headquarters here in the bay area. >> is there one regional issue that elected officials across the region could focus on? if we are back here 12 months from now, i am able to ask you the question -- here is what you said 12 months ago and here is where we are now. is there one thing? >> i think it will be transportation. we have to make that infrastructure investment. we have to get our federal and state government more aligned. i know jerry is a big fan of our high speed rail, but we have to turn the corner on that. for us, in san francisco, a third of our flights out of sfo is to los angeles. we cannot have the capacity for international flights. the whole secret behind
aging and disability technology summit. it was approximately a month ago that secretary kathleen sebelius said the u.s. department of health and human services announced the creation of this new federal agency, and that is the administration for community living. and in her words, she said "for too long, too many americans have faced the a possible choice between moving to an institution or living at home without the long-term services and support they need." so this new administration for community living will be to helping people with disabilities, as well as seniors, to live a productive, satisfying lives. now, as you may be aware, the aging and disability population has been recognized actually at the local and state levels for quite some time now. so the mechanisms for providing support that facility community living have been really brought together into local and state agencies such as the san francisco departments the of aging and adult services that serves those populations since the year 2000. yet, at the federal level, policy developments from a community outreach, and
, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the n
technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset too early, or too late, you're wasting money. it costs about three times as much to fix a system once it's failed. so it's all about finding that right point where the dollars should flow toward that asset. narrator: but finding the funds to evaluate and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spent. and somehow that has to be made up. so t
get older because we are, in a sense, not practicing enough. the reason we are here is technology. the technology is all about providing input, a life that we can live that doesn't require living life without the troublesome requirement of having much of a brain. these are wonderful things. the american citizen watches this in the upper left for about seven hours a day. that is information without action. i loved it. but in moderation. on the lower left. we see a topographic map from a satellite. what you see in red is the city of baltimore. places where the sunlight does not hit the ground because it is all paved. it is to make sure that every footfall is secure and you cannot pay a bit of attention to it. many of you have been doing it for quite a few years now. it is not good to sleepwalk through life. that way we don't have to worry about a thing. there is no bond on the floor. it is designed to be controlled and removed our brains of for having to worry about the details. i use google for an hour or two or three every day and my work and in my life. what a wonderful tool. it
industry is so afraid of technology is that now we can track this down. before, we would have to go through way bill and everyone's way bill and you wrote down a wc and we have to take your word for it and make a few phone calls and see what happened. now, with the para transit program because it is all completely automated and they use a debit card including our wheelchair customers we know who got into a vehicle, when they got into that vehicle and where they went and how much they paid for it. now we are able to track and we picked up 0 wheelchair customers or you picked up 54 wheelchair customer and now we can track that and this is one of the reasons that many in our industris that been afraid of that technology because now we are able to enforce the standards that were on the books before but no one was able to truly enforce without looking at the hand records that were produced by the driver themselves. >> what we want to do and demonstrate to our drivers and to our medallion holders is simply that, the days of simply driving and doing whatever you feel like are done. what we now wan
is insignificant for the center of the significance, it is the emerging technology and we made some improvement in the intrusion detection and does require light and so as the camera evolved and so did the lighting scheme with it. we are getting near the end of my list and thank you for being patient i want to do it confidently for you. >> there were many systems in a building, the tradition has been for the systems to be individual. and one of the things that the director changered with the team with was looking toward a future where the technology is designed in the building would represent state of the art when the building opened. >> and in order to accomplish that, the industry is pointed in the direction of providing hardware and software to colese these systems instead of looking at ten monitors you look at fewer and the information is collected and put through a policy engine, that is a decision-making engine that informed by people and actionable information is placed to people who under crisis may not think as clearly as they otherwise might. so a security, piecing system which is wh
was she was telling us to go forward 2030 in term of technologies and looking back to today. but this conference with all the vendors we had here had an amazing impact on me as learning of new technologies. i really feel in the 21st century of different types of technologies. i'm not going to make any pitches here. but bottom line is we are learning and this conference to me, and i know for many of us here, it was a great learning experience. thank you. >> awesome, thank you. (applause) >> thank you. all right. if we don't have any more questions, i'm going to give it over to drew to do his little sales pitch up there. or any announcements that need to be made. >> [speaker not understood]. >> okay, do you want the microphone? i'll hold it. i'm kidding. here you go. >> i'm obviously part of the nonprofit [speaker not understood], i have a products company. and for what it's worth, it hasn't gone to development yet. but we have a one-coat film that so far is working on traffic signs with unlimited cleanings. once it goes to market we'll let you know at the 2013 conference. we'
discussion on science, technology, engineering and math. stem, is what we all call it these days. that is the jealousy of all of the other mayers that when they hear about stotterry of mission bay, they are trying to create their own mission bay in their cities and they are wanting to work with all of the universities and the talent because what we have done here, is not only the physical infrastructure, not only creating conditions for businesses to be successful, but we found that we should invest in the very talent that is here and expand on that talent and so it is the noble laurets and the post doctorate students that are here and they are working with people across all of other disciplines, start ups, technology, you hear these great stories and i have seen them myself and we walk in and people no longer using these small microscopes, but they are looking at 3 d technology from auto def and we are looking at cells in three different ways, four different ways, expanding, deepening, all of the science, this is the movement that we have, and this is our new economy and this is
'm going to go down the line. as we get to our military partners i'd ask if there's other technologies that you think that you have that you want to share about that may be helpful as we start to get into fire season. please share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears,
, even in the face of all these technology companies that are coming here and helping us uplift our economy, even within that success, you hear me talking about the people who aren't getting those jobs, the people who are making decisions everyday in our streets, in our community, and i will not be mincing words -- it is in the bay view. in in the visitation valley. it is in the mission where their dispute resolution is at the end of a gun and this is the way they're talking. this is the way they're dealing with each other and then with anybody who attempts to interfere with that. you have heard me say even with the success of all of our departments and everything that they're doing i can't give a job to a dead youth no matter what we do, and so i can have the best training programs. i can have a high number of jobs available. eric mcdonald and i can create 10,000 jobs in the summer, but if our youth are resolving their differences with the point of a gun or the end of a knife those jobs are never going to be available to them. how do we interrupt that violence? i cannot put i
and about 500 consultants. puc is really embracing technology. we wanted to make sure we really had a system that would elevate all issues so we could address them in a timely manner. as you know, time is money. we have a construction management information system. it is a great tool to help us address construction and make it successful, as it is today. cmis is one of the first major tools we put in place. the next one is the san francisco online invoicing, where we are now working with the contractor and consultant to have them submit their invoices online. we are also working on electronic bidding systems. another way we can reduce the paperwork and all the other issues tied with the procurements. i live in san francisco. i am a rate-payer. i really care about the way we spend our money. systems like this that will allow transparency, clarity, accountability, and efficiency -- i think systems like this need to be applied to all parts of the city. we really strive to lead and embraced technology so we can be ahead of the game. [applause] >> we are spending $15 million per week just on our
to intro daus a lot of technology to help with the interoperatability of the civil military exercise. one of the main goals that we had for this was to allow our military a crisis response adaptive force package and opportunity to allow their training and certification in providing the most appropriate military expeditionary force for that scenario. one of the things that we realize in the military when we do these exercises in a foreign humanitarian response, that a lot of our military capabilities are not just for overseas foreign disasters but it also allows the military to be trained and certified to respond to local domestic disaster situations as well. i had mentioned that we had 22 nations participating in rimpac and this slide is a representation of the military and civilian partners that we had participating in this event. and we had many, many international partners and we had a lot of domestic partners: medical and military editionary partners as well. okay, this is our command and control slide. we took a lot of care to get this right. we wanted to make sure that we portra
a meeting we try to do some new training or talk about the technology available, i will talk about the technology in my class this afternoon. it's really good because we document it because when you go to court, you can show training on a monthly basis. conferences, i can't tell you how excited i am these are happening. only in the last two or three years have these major conferences come about. the one up in canada, they were a great group of conferences and other people started to pick up on this. when i became an officer dealing with gravanis in 1991, there were no conferences and there was virtually no interest. as dr. spicer mentioned, every time it got good, i foupld myself out of a job. i was out of a job for about 6 months because it fell apart and then came back together. mer and more cities are realizing gravanis is a pattern crime and as dr. spicer pointed out, it's a great way crime to many other activities. so you can wind up precluding with a lot of other stuff by dealing with them when they are down to the part doing gravanis damage before they escalate to a mo
, the technology plan. you will notice this year that, as was shepherded by this commission, the technology policy now is included in each of the capital project sheets and how that capital project is reviewed against the technology policy is a new thing this year. community benefits on investments in the garden project in [speaker not understood], and also the schools with the environmental science center. also very large improvements in the southwest community center are here. that is a commitment that you have asked us to make and that we continue to charge forward with. so, what is before you, then, is really those small changes and the rest of the items in item number 10 are your adoption legislation, unless you have any amendments that you would like. and i know president torres, when we talked about the bond savings, had proposed a consideration of that amendment as well. i'm happy to answer any questions and all the other agms are here to respond as well. >> any questions from members of the commission? i have some as well. commissioner moran. >> thank you. first of all, thanks to the staf
by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data offic
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)

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